The Case, The Hela Case Has Raised Questions About The Legality Of Using Genetic Materials Without Permission

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I choose Henrietta Lacks study case, the HeLa case has raised questions about the legality of using genetic materials without permission. Neither Mrs. Lacks nor her family granted permission to harvest her cells, which were then cloned and sold since the 1950s. Recently, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory published the genome of a line of HeLa cells, making it publicly available for downloading. Another study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health at the University of Washington, was about to be published in Nature. The Lacks family was made aware of neither project. Eric S. Lander, the founding director of the Broad Institute, a science research center at Harvard and M.I.T., said resolving these issues is crucial to taking advantage of the knowledge hidden in our genomes.“If we are going to solve cancer, it’s going to take a movement of tens of thousands, or hundreds of thousands, of patients willing to contribute information from their cancer genomes towards a common good,” Dr. Lander said. “We are going to need to have ways to have patients feel comfortable doing that. We can’t do it without a foundation of respect and trust.” Henrietta Lacks was born Loretta Pleasant on August 1, 1920, in Roanoke, Virginia, at some point she changed her name to Henrietta. On January 1951 Mrs. Lack arrived at her local doctor with abdominal pain, and profuse vaginal bleeding, she was tested for syphilis, which came back negative, and referred to Johns

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