The Cask Of Amontillado By Edgar Allen Poe

851 WordsNov 17, 20154 Pages
The truth about “The Cask of Amontillado” Do hate someone, but act like they are your best friend to get something that you want from them? Edgar Allen Poe does in his story “The Cask of Amontillado” as he uses Montresor to tell Fortunato’s journey to catacombs and how he “conceives and executes an ingenious plan... for revenging” Fortunato (Gruesser 129). In “The cask of Amontillado” Poe uses tone, plot devices, and the setting to present the theme of appearances masking reality. To begin, Poe uses one to show the irony of the events that lead to Fortunato’s fate. Bill Delaney points out that Montresor not only pretends that he is Fortunato’s friend, but consistently calls him “my friend” and even seems to take pity on him when he says “my poor friend” while Montresor is plotting against him in his head the entire time (Delaney 40). This is ironic because the reader can almost believe that Montresor has forgiven Fortunato, when in reality he is a peace with killing Fortunato. In the beginning of the story Fortunato greeted Montresor with “excessive warmth” (Poe 147). Fortunato could have made the choice to greet Montresor in this way because he either believed that they were good friends or because of his drunkenness. Either way Fortunato seems to be exceptionally happy to see Montresor which is ironic because Montresor leaves Fortunato cold, depressed, and seemingly sober. Montresor pretends “to be his concerned friend” and repeatedly asks Fortunato if he would rather
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