The Causes of the American Revolution Essay

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The American Revolution was sparked by a myriad of causes. These causes in themselves could not have sparked such a massive rebellion in the nation, but as the problems of the colonies cumulated, their collective impact spilt over and the American Revolution ensued. Many say that this war could have been easily avoided and was poorly handled by both sides, British and American; but as one will see, the frame of thought of the colonists was poorly suited to accept British measures which sought to “overstep” it’s power in the Americas. Because of this mindset, colonists developed a deep resentment of British rule and policies; and as events culminated, there was no means to avoid revolution and no way to turn back.

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The British military also played a role in starting the revolution. As Britain began to call more and more troops into the colonies, especially after the seven years war, many of the citizens began to doubt their purpose. The British justified stationing troops by saying that it was to cut expenditures. Yes it did cut expenditures, but to the dismay of the colonists, the burden of housing soldiers, due to the Quartering act of 1765, was laid upon them. This caused great dissent, for as the population of Boston was only approximately 18,000, the troops made up more than one fifth of the population. But cutting spending wasn’t the only objective in bring in troops. Parliament also wanted to use the troops in order to enforce the British legislature’s rules and ordinances. The troops served as intimidation to keep the colonists in check. But as Americans became more rebellious, England funneled in more troops. In 1774, the British responded to the Boston tea party by establishing the Coercive Acts. These acts in addition to closing Boston harbor and subjecting everyone to admiralty courts also shipped in 3000 soldiers and put the state of Massachusetts under martial law. Thus, in towns, there developed great tension between the people and the British troops, an uneasiness that would reside and alienate the colonists from the empire.

More importantly, the colonist resented
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