The Cherokee Tribe

1483 Words6 Pages
The Cherokee tribe is known as one of the earliest and largest Indian tribe in North America. They are federally recognized even today among several states(museum). While they slowly became Americanized by the Europeans who came over to America, some still practice their typical Indian rituals publicly today. Most converted to Christianity and their government in Oklahoma is based off the American government with three branches. One would believe that the Trail of Tears could have completely vanquished these Indians but many made it through the horrendous trial and kept the Indian bloodline going even present day (Conley). To begin with, the Cherokee name translates as “the real people” (Raley). This means they are indigenous people in…show more content…
Today, one can still find several “stomp grounds” which are a series of dances among a sacred fire. It was a secretive ritual for a long time but has slowly increased to a more public performance (Conley).
In Contrast, many people would judge many Cherokee Indians as ordinary Americans for the way they believe, look, and interact today (Conley). They were the first Native American nation to develop its own language which was created by Chief Sequoyah. This allowed the translation of European written languages (Gilio-Whitaker). When Europeans first arrived to America, their Christian religion was much different than that of the Indian religion. These newly immigrated Americans worked to convert and Americanize the Indians by passing the “civilization” policy. Many Indians were willing to learn English and convert to Christianity. Some were eager to learn English, so they could fight the white people. Eventually, the New Testament was translated along with scriptures, hymnals, and services to the language of the Cherokee (Raley).
When Europeans first arrived to America, Indians were living in eight present states: Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, the Virginias, Alabama, and the Carolinas (Museum). Slowly, the Cherokee were forced to sign treaties giving away land to the new nation. In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson finally worked to pass a treaty that would force all Indians west of the Mississippi River. It wasn’t until Andrew Jackson

More about The Cherokee Tribe

Get Access