The Chilling Opening of Truman Capote's In Cold Blood Essay

920 Words 4 Pages
The definition of ‘chilling’ according to the dictionary is defined as “make someone or thing feel cold.” The title ‘In Cold Blood’ is chilling because it makes the reader shiver with agitation and immediately gives them a sense of repulsion because the idea of cold blood is disturbing since blood gives you life and warmth. “a sudden ‘case of blood bubbles’?” Capote contrasts this to the title and creates a horrific image in relation to the title. In Cold Blood is a true account of a multiple murder case in Holcomb, Kansas and is told from two alternating perspectives, the Clutter family who are the victims and the two murderers, Dick Hickock and Perry Smith. The way Capote structures the first section is powerful and it allows the reader …show more content…
People had very small reasons to complain about him. “he was known for his equanimity, his charitableness, and the fact that he paid good wages and distributed frequent bonuses.” Mr Clutter was indeed living the American Dream, his family consisted of a loving son, a nearly perfect daughter, a content wife and a hardworking father, Mr clutter himself. His family was like none other, they worked and lived in synchronisation. Despite this loving picture of a perfect family, Mr Clutter’s American Dream was shattered by two men. It is horrific knowing that Mr Clutter’s American Dream has turned into an American Nightmare. A focused, diligent man who had worked hard to achieve what he had in his life and was suddenly crushed. In comparison to Dick’s dreams, “who wanted ‘a regular life’, with a business of his own, a horse to ride, a new car, and ‘plenty of blonde chicken.” Is killing the answer to get to his American Dream? Hardly anyone had a dislike for the Clutters, even the murderers are not motivated by hate because they do not know them, but they are simply motivated by greed.

Capote structures the book in a unique way that engages the reader, he presents and organises the events and characters in a way which the reader is familiar with the names. As Dick and Perry approach Holcomb and the Clutters go about their everyday life, Capote juxtaposes them back and forth like a pattern, the victims, the murderers, the victims, the murderers. The way Capote has structured