The Civil Rights Of The United States

951 WordsNov 5, 20144 Pages
Civil rights have been a big issue throughout American history. From the time America was formed, groups have been discriminated against due to their ethnicity, religion, and race. Slaves were not considered American so they did not have rights. They did not become American citizens until the Fourteenth Amendment was passed in 1868. Still, African Americans still did not have as many rights as other groups. Almost a century after the Fourteenth Amendment was enacted, African Americans were still fighting for equal rights. That is where Civil Rights leaders like Fannie Lou Hamer and Martin Luther King Jr. come in; with any cause, there are those who oppose it: in this case it would be George C. Wallace. Fannie Lou Hamer was a resident of Mississippi. In 1962, she decided that she would go register to vote, along with a group of others. They traveled to Indianola by bus. When she went to apply, she had to take a literacy test: included reading, writing and interpretation. When the bus was on its way back to Ruleville, state patrol officers stopped them and told them to head back to Indianola. When they returned, one of the men on the bus was arrested and the bus driver was fined $100 (later reduced to thirty dollars) for the bus being too yellow. Due to her trying to register to vote, the landowner kicked her off of the land that she lived on for 18 years (Hamer). Throughout her entire ordeal, she did not fight back. She took a pacifistic approach. She did not stand up for
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