The Constitution Of The United States

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It was accepted on November 15, 1777, by Congress and confirmed by the state on March 1, 1781. The Articles of Confederation were a respectful effort by a new country and to create an ideal national government. Although to some states that form of government was not happy because the Articles of Confederation will soon become a disadvantage. The Constitution Of United States was established in 1787. The Constitution of United States was written as a set of rules for this country. Many of the “rules” have helped the country stay in order. The constitution gave more power to the national government than the Articles of Confederation. Fifty-five representatives met in Philadelphia in 1787 to establish a new government for the better. The…show more content…
Check and Balances makes sure no one has more power than the other so everyone can be treated equal. We live in a democracy which means as United States citizens we get the freedom to express yourself, fair trial by jury, right to vote, freedom to pursue “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”, and etc. We get freedom living in a democracy regardless of what happens in the future, they can not take our rights away from us. For the first written Constitution of the United States which was the Articles of Confederation the power to make laws known as the legislative branch was made equal. The congress had full power to form a union and to make war. Therefore, the power gives to the Congress allowed it to operate with an minimum control over every other state. One thing that was effective was in the allowance of equal votes in Congress for each state. However, the United States government lacked a system of taxation. Under the Articles of Confederation, the Congress had no power to tax the states instead of the tax they depended on the donations by the states. The states wished for a moderate government involvement and were repulsed by the idea of federal taxation. Another obstacle in a successful government was that the Articles did not grant Congress the power to impose its laws.In place of executive and judicial branches, the
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