The Constitutional Convention Of The United States

989 WordsSep 24, 20154 Pages
On a mostly forgotten day in American history, September 14, 1786, Alexander Hamilton called for a “Grand Convention” of the newly independent American states to amend the struggling Articles of Confederation. He did so with the approval of twelve delegates from five states that convened in Annapolis originally for the purpose of discussing interstate trade. What these delegates didn’t realize is that the convention they were calling for would produce a document that would shape the course of human history. On Friday, May 25, 1787, fifty-five delegates from twelve states (only Rhode Island declined to attend) officially convened the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia at Independence Hall. George Washington was elected as the convention’s President and William Jackson became the Secretary. The delegates promptly decided to completely abandon the Articles of Confederation and create a new constitution from scratch. James Madison’s Virginia Plan was speedily introduced to the convention. This proposal created a more robust federal government with a legislative, executive, and judicial branch. The legislature made of an upper and lower house. The lower house was elected by the people and states were apportioned members according to population. The members of the upper house, also apportioned to each state by population, were elected by members of the lower house from nominations given by the state legislatures. This plan infuriated the smaller states, as they had an
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