The Contributions of Frederick Douglas, William Apess, Sarah Margaret Fuller, and Sojourner Truth

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The Contributions of Frederick Douglas, William Apess, Sarah Margaret Fuller, and Sojourner Truth

As has been noted before, when we look at the authors of The Declaration of Independence, we are quite aware that the 'document' was written in the interest of the people who were there. The wealthy, white, landowners make up the Constitution to fit their needs and exclude everyone else. The people most notably left without rights are African American's, Native American's and Women. These minority groups formed a bond with each other because they were outside the dominant group. These groups of people helped gain their strength and voice through speeches and conventions with each one using the very words of the Constitution as
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He goes on to explain his real life experiences. Douglas says:" Fellow citizens, I am not wanting in respect for the fathers of this republic. The signers of the Declaration of Independence were brave men. They were great men too-great enough to give fame to a great age. It does not often happen to a nation to raise, at one time, such a number of truly great men. The point from which I am compelled to view them is not, certainly, the most favorable; and yet I cannot contemplate their great deeds with less than admiration. They were statesmen, patriots, and heroes, and for the good they did, and the principles they contend for, I will unite with you to honor their memory"(1822). What Douglas does here is recognize and respect these men to the crowd and make himself part of the group by honoring them together and yet he still gets his point across. "Douglas was known as an articulate antislavery speaker his speeches for the Massachusetts Antislavery Society cemented Douglas' role as an abolitionists. Douglas also worked for the Underground Railroad"(owl-eyes 1).

Another minority to gain his voice during the American Renaissance was William Apess." The earliest major Indian writers of the nineteenth century, William Apess...contrast's white's savage treatment of non-whites with their professed Christianity"(1867). Apess uses the Bible to gain his audience's sympathy with his cause. In An Indian's

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