The Crucible By Arthur Miller

1269 Words6 Pages
At first glance, the playwright Arthur Miller in The Crucible highlights the historical significance of the Salem Witch Trials of 1692, but in fact it is an allegorical expression of his perception of McCarthyism. If the reader has some background information on Arthur Miller’s victimization as a communist, it is evident that the play is a didactic vessel illustrating the flaws of the court system in the 1950’s. The communist allegations were launched at government employees, entertainers and writers, without the proper regard for evidence. In order to alert the media and the citizens in the United States of the Red Scare, and its injustice, Miller writes The Crucible. His play serves as mirror image of the way the government in 1950…show more content…
John Proctor and Elizabeth Proctor had reached a downfall in their relationship after Proctor’s affair with Abigail Williams. Ever since, Proctor had tried to gain back Elizabeth’s respect which proved their deep rooted love for one another. This angered Abigail since she was in love with Proctor, which lead her to accuse Elizabeth of Witchcraft. Throughout the court trials, Proctor continuously defends Elizabeth and himself, yet realizes he must tell the truth on how he committed adultery. Elizabeth, renown for her honesty, lies in the court to try and save Proctor, however, she is ultimately contradicting the truth Proctor had previously told. Elizabeth’s false confession led Proctor to his death, even though Proctor had cried out, “She only thought to save my name!” (Miller 113). Proctor’s confession signifies that he was protecting Elizabeth to help her get out of jail which also would have proved that Abigail was making false accusations. On the other hand, Elizabeth’s fabricated confession could have saved Proctor’s name, and would allow him to keep is high esteem. Proctor and Elizabeth’s twisted situation suggests that the truth would not always set one free. In this case, all the truth that had been confessed was enough to prove Proctor and Elizabeth innocent, yet one lie tore it all apart. Even though Proctor confessed all his truth to prove innocence, the
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