The Death Of A Brother And Friends

899 WordsMay 6, 20154 Pages
In five-year duration, Jesmyn Ward, the author of Men We Raped, lost five people to accidents, life-to-drugs, suicide, and other poverty-related incidents. Dealing with loss motivated the author to begin asking questions. While writing about her personal experiences, Ward realizes the truth behind her miseries, which blows her away. "Most of the men in my life thought their stories, whether they were drug dealers or straight-laced, were worthy of being written about," Ward writes. "Then, I laughed it off. Now, as I write these stories, I see the truth of their claims" (Ward 12). The deaths of a brother and friends are apparently linked to the history of economic struggle and racism, which promoted drug addiction, as well as the dissolution of relationships and family. She believes that the answers to the incidents are so obvious and wonders why she was so blurred visualize. Jesmyn Ward was brought up in Mississippi in a life pervaded with poverty, and where men were noticeably absent. The author tells the story bravely while revisiting the agonies of losing a brother and friends. As the only member of her family who had the privilege of accessing higher education, Ward documents the parallels in the American world with the intimacy and objectivity. A brutal mainstream rendered beautifully, the memoir by Jesmyn Word will indeed sit contentedly alongside myriad masterpieces that address the issue of racism. The superb memoir by Jesmyn Ward serves as a relevant and powerful
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