The Death Of A Free Man

1454 Words May 14th, 2016 6 Pages
After committing murder, Meursault was arrested and put in jail. While in jail, he had to see the magistrate a few times, and in those visits he found himself being irritated because of the heat. As Meursault was being questioned, he felt the air “getting hotter and hotter” (Camus 69), and it creates a mood of irritation. He did not want to hear anymore of the imposing tirade given by the magistrate. Then Meursault stated that he “could see the red sand and feel the burning of the sun on [his] forehead” (Camus 67). In this scene, he got irritated and angry when he was forced to believe that there was meaning in life. He does not want anything that is going to disturb his state and “thoughts...of a free man” (Camus 76). As a free man, the only thing that matters is living life detached from the world because this ensures that he would not have to deal with the irrationality of things. Just like what Sprintzen argued on his article “The Stranger”, Meursault “does not ‘live by the rules’. He does not think like ordinary people. He does not pay his respects, but seems indifferent to everything that is usually taken seriously” (Sprintzen). His strangeness allows his emotional state to be controlled by the sun and the heat. The sun and the heat affect his physical being and it prevents him from acknowledging his emotions. The sun and the weather serve as a controlling force that allow Meursault to escape the irrationality of life.
Another big motif in the novel is how Meursault…

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