The Death Of The Euthanasia Program

1313 WordsSep 7, 20146 Pages
The Euthanasia Program The famous, world-renowned scientist Albert Einstein once said that "we cannot despair of humanity, since we ourselves are human beings." Yet, there came a tragic time, not too long ago, when even the basic, most primal nature of the human race was questioned. Why would our society, as a whole of human civilization, go to such means just to slaughter our sisters and brothers of another realm, another faith, or another race? The appalling events that ensued during the cataclysm of World War II still impact many today, grim battle scars passed down the years through morbid tales and painful memories. To this day, many Holocaust horror stories still exist, but one of Hitler 's fatal racial extermination plans, a hushed…show more content…
Soon after, "special treatment centers". emerged for the program, and in October of the same year, health organizations encouraged parents to send their disabled children to these institutions for their own well-being (United States Holocaust Encyclopedia). Sadly, little to none of these families ever saw their children again. The children transported to these secret institutions were starved or even poisoned with Luminol, a barbiturate which was then dissolved in tea. After, they were cremated, and sent back home in urns listing false causes of death, such as pneumonia (Soumerai and Schulz 67). As the scope of the killings widened to young adults up to even seventeen years of age, the Euthanasia Program become known as an "open secret". In fact, this was a truth that many knew, but kept quiet out of fear of speaking out. Unfortunately, their cause for alarm was genuine; at least 5,000 children died as a result of the horrific Child Euthanasia Program (United States Holocaust Encyclopedia). During the years of 1939 to 1941, Joseph Goebbels, a German politician and a Reich minister, began promoting the extermination of the disabled through propaganda. He used government media to persuade the public that disabled individuals were inferior and undeserving of life, and even wrought his influence upon schools, where children solved math
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