The Death Of The Funeral Business

1089 Words Nov 10th, 2015 5 Pages
Sandy Hingston offers many intriguing views of a funeral service from the conventional method of a service in a church and the burial of the deceased to a service that more so relates to a party than a funeral. “The Death of the Funeral Business” also raises many questions to be pondered by the reader. Hingston says, “A societal changeover from burial to cremation is momentous for our culture. It signals a cataclysmic shift in how we think about our bodies and ourselves” (38). The questions that arise from this quote are what parallels may Hingston be trying to draw between the trend in cremation and the way we “think about our bodies and ourselves?” Why may she be trying to develop these connections? These are the questions I will be focusing on and how they relate to what I think the purpose of the article is. I believe the purpose of this article is to show how our generation is changing the way we view death and how the use of technology has greatly impacted the way funerals are done. The question what parallels may Hingston be trying to draw between the trend in cremation and the way we “think about our bodies and ourselves” is a pretty loaded one. The quote, “the rise of cremation dovetails neatly with the increase in those of us who have no religious affiliation” (38) answers this question nicely. Without religion, and a sense of my body matters traveling through people’s heads, people are going to realize that there isn’t a point to being buried only to be…
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