The Decisive Treatise: Averroes

911 Words 4 Pages
With the passing of the notable ancient Greek greats, a new era in philosophy emerged. The Medieval period fostered an outburst of Islamic culture and thought, with many significant philosophers leading the way. Amongst these was Averroes, who thrived during the early 12th century. His many areas of interest allowed him to be a very learned and experienced individual, enabling him to produce many publications elaborating his thoughts. One of these publications is The Decisive Treatise, in which he discusses the role that philosophy plays in religion and how that impacts society. According to Averroes, in The Decisive Treatise, philosophy is a required part of religion that provides educated individuals with a deeper understanding of …show more content…
The unmentioned aspects are the parts that are open for interpretation, while the mentioned have definite meanings and are accepted by all. It is universally agreed upon by all Muslims, from many generations, that some Laws are apparent thus anyone who disputes those Laws is clearly wrong. All people seem to be united by the concept that certain Laws are indispensable and forever applicable, while others can be extended beyond just what is stated. The extensions of these Laws are also subject to criticism. Although interpretations are an option, the original idea of the Law must not be lost in the process of thought. Philosophy also seems to be a privilege only given to the learned. Averroes divides the society into two classes: the uneducated class and the demonstrative class. The demonstrative class is the group of philosophers who are allowed to interpret text because they demonstrate their understanding of the God by using “the most perfect kind of reasoning”(165). He then further divides the Law into three different grades. The first grade is text that can only be accepted by its apparent meaning. This means that the text is not open for study and must be taken point blank, so to speak. All who interpret it the wrong way can be said to be unbelievers. The second grade is text that must be analyzed through its inner meaning by the demonstrative class, but through its apparent meaning by