The Development of Juliet's Character in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

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The Development of Juliet's Character in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

This essay is about Juliet's character and I am going to talk about how her behaviour develops towards Romeo, her Nurse, and on her own respectively. In the prologue we are informed that, 'a pair of star crossed lovers take their life,' [line 6, prologue]. This is to make us feel sympathy towards Romeo and Juliet. We also have to remember Juliet is only 13 at the start of the play and little more than a child; but she has potential to mature during the course of the play.

Act 1 Scene 5 is the first encounter between the lovers. In this scene I think Juliet is clever just doing enough to keep Romeo interested, 'Good
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Referring to that if Romeo was not a Montague the family wouldn't object. Juliet shows how forward she is in this scene as well by asking Romeo whether he loved her, and also proposing to him. This was a very odd thing for a woman to do in Elizabethan times.

Going back to act 1 scene 3, this is the first time we see Juliet and also her first scene with the Nurse. In this scene Juliet shows maturity with her use of language as in act 1 scene 5. 'It is a honour that I dream not of,' [line 69 act 1 scene 3] is Juliet's reply to her mother's difficult question of marriage. This is resourceful because she says she is not ready, but at the same time using honour to compliment her mother, thus keeping her on Juliet's side. As with the Nurse Juliet is very patient with her when the Nurse reminisces at length about her past, 'and since that time it is eleven years,' [line 38 act 1 scene 3]. This scene also really shows how close Juliet is with the Nurse, 'Thou was the prettiest babe that ever I nursed,' [line 63 act 1 scene 3], which is a compliment Nurse gives to Juliet. Juliet is loving towards the Nurse and takes her advice seriously, that is why Lady Capulet calls her back, 'Nurse come back again,' [line 9 act 1 scene 3], to talk about marriage. At the end of this scene the Nurse says Paris is, 'He's a man of wax,' [line 79 act 1 scene