The Developmental Nature of Cognition Essay

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According to constructivist and cognitive theorists, cognition is defined as the processes of acquiring knowledge and understanding through perception, reasoning, judgment, thought, and experiences (Mora, 2007). The developmental stages of cognition have many implications in the educational setting. It is important for educators to understand the stages of development to facilitate the learning process of students from preschool to graduate studies. This paper will explore the developmental nature of cognition from the viewpoint of stage and social learning theories. Although the major focus is on cognitive development, it will also explore the implications in educational settings that deal with mild intellectually…show more content…
The premise of this line of investigation focuses on the social behavior of observing and how it affects cognition. Many regard social learning principles as a bridge between behavior and cognitive approaches to understanding the process of learning. Other notable social learning authors include domain, community and practice studies by Jean Lave and Etienne Wender, as well as discovery learning by Jerome Bruner. The curiosity of the processes of cognition and its application to learning in schools has developed into the practice of educational psychology. This branch explores the effectiveness of learning and focuses on marginal groups such as gifted and special education subgroups in institutional settings. One major goal of cognitive theory is to determine the processes involved in learning. With this in mind, the following examines cognition from birth through adulthood. The prenatal period is defined as the time from conception to birth and biologically is marked as a time of tremendous growth (Santrock, 1999). Though cognitive theory begins in the infancy stages of human development, it is important to note that many scientist believe that the experiences that occur while a child is in the womb is as influential on cognition as any other period of time in the stages of growth. In an article by Mrazik and Dombrowski (2010), the
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