The Disney Princess Effect I Felt

981 WordsDec 18, 20164 Pages
The Disney Princess Effect I felt as though the text related to me in regards to being a little girl and recalling exactly what the author is pertaining to. Going through the stages of wishing to be a princess or waiting for your prince to arrive for the simple fact of the visual enchantment television gave and then sooner or later growing up to only realize fairy tales and reality beg to differ. In the beginning, Stephanie Hanes writes “She came to believe that the $4 Billion Disney Princess empire was the first down a path of scarier challenges, from self-objection to cyberbullying to unhealth body image.” Having dealt with my own perseverance with body image I agree with Hanes and how the falsified happiness hammered into young girls is hindering. If we were to allow them to grow freely and not in a mold of what society perceives as beautiful we would have more intelligent, confident and free women. The problem is the hidden message Sleeping Beauty for example Aurora is described as an extraordinarily beautiful woman, so young girls will understand, even if they are not directly told, that is what society perceives as beautiful. If you have ever seen “Sleeping Beauty,” however, you will notice that Aurora’s figure is as impossible as Barbie’s for humans to achieve. Unfortunately, this is not isolated just to “Sleeping Beauty.” All of Disney’s princesses, and even some of the female villains, are impossibly proportioned, and the ones who are not, like Ursula of “The
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