The Doctrine Of The Me Underpin Aristotle 's Account Of Citizen Virtue?

899 WordsApr 28, 20154 Pages
To what extent, and how, does ‘the doctrine of the mean’ underpin Aristotle’s account of citizen virtue? In order to answer the question ‘To what extent, and how, does ‘the doctrine of the mean’ underpin Aristotle’s account of citizen virtue?’ it is first important for me to define ‘the doctrine of the mean’ which was developed in Book II of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (II.2.1104a12-26) in the form of a medical analogy. ‘the doctrine of the mean’ is very often dismissed as being unhelpful and unfortunate by many scholars. Aristotle was an ancient philosopher who was born circa. 384. B.C. It is commonly believed that together with Socrates and Plato, he laid the foundations for today’s western philosophy. Many scholars disagree on where the name ‘Nicomachean Ethics’ comes from, as Aristotle’s father and son are both named Nicomachus, so it could be dedicated to either one. Quoted from Book II, Chapter 6 ‘So virtue is a purposive disposition, lying in a mean that is relative to us and determined by a rational principle, by that which a prudent man would use to determine it.’ This quotation aids us in in understanding Aristotle’s ‘Doctrine of the mean’ A virtue is a positive trait, which is seen to be morally proficient. Aristotle analysed virtues in two different forms, moral and intellectual. However, Aristotle refers to virtue as a ‘purposive disposition’ meaning that virtue is the incentive to point us to a virtuous lifestyle. Directly ‘the doctrine of the mean’

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