The Dystopian Novel, Brave New World By Aldous Huxley And Fahrenheit 451 By Ray Bradbury

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The dystopian fiction genre has been created through fear of the future and delivered

through horrifying stories with strong sexual undertones. The realization of important truths is

not an easy task for most people, so dystopian novelists must resort to various fairly extreme

methods to make sure that there is no mistaking the message. Authors such as George Orwell,

Ray Bradbury, and Aldous Huxley extend characteristics of their societies to the breaking point

in order to warn the public to avoid the possible self-destruction of humanity, as well as

illustrating that sexuality is the main source of change. This genre study used the most

renowned and recognized works of the dystopian genre: Nineteen Eighty-Four by George

Orwell, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, and Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury.

Dystopian fiction stems from satire upon utopian novels and their uplifting view of the

possible future. Utopian novels tell stories of perfect societies, places where true communism

works and it works well. Man has not found utopia yet, and dystopian authors feel that we will

never reach that state. They paint a future where we have the opposite of utopia, a place

where nothing is fair, but in doing so comments on utopian thoughts, letting the world know

that it is an ultimately impossible goal because of the natural tendency of humans to be greedy.

Even with genetic alterations, the greed of humanity cannot be contained; therefore, it appears

that a utopia will

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