The Early Stages of Psychology

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The Early Stages of Psychology Philip C. Allen PSY/310 May 3, 2012 Shruthi Vale The Early Stages of Psychology People have been searching for answers to life’s problems since the dawn of mankind. Humans would look to the stars for answers. They would look to nature for a cure. They even looked toward the heavens for gods to cure their ailments. Not until recently did we, as a race, begin to look toward ourselves to find solutions. We now know that we are capable of tapping into our minds and understanding what lies at the root of our mental illnesses. Beginnings Psychology is still in its infancy when compared with…show more content…
Structuralism eventually died with Titchener (Cherry, 2012). Victorian Thomas Brown proposed the study of the mind as the basic framework for most scientific efforts. He believed that before any science could be taken seriously, the brain must be studied. Not only the physicality of the brain, but also the workings of the mind and how it thinks (Wee, 2005). With Brown’s proposal, the majority of serious psychologists would no longer ignore the real world implications of human experience and action when dealing with the functioning of the mind. In 1885, Herbert Spencer published The Principles of Psychology. Spencer had a strong background in biology and philosophy, therefore much of his writings were based solely on speculation, observation, and philosophical ideals. Wee (2005), “One of Spencer 's most famous phrases was "survival of the fittest", which later formed the basis of a controversial branch of psychology/philosophy called Social Darwinism” (para. 4). Conclusion Since the days of Greek and French philosophers and German physiologists, we have developed a sound science. We can delve deeper than ever before. We see beyond the layers of our conscious mind. We can look into our past to raise questions about our childhood and answer age old questions that were asked by unconscious. Today’s
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