The Economic Inequality Of Hispanic Immigrant And The United States By Using Micro / Macro Level Lenses

1049 Words5 Pages
HDFS 895 Families in Poverty
Hyunjin Choi (Hailey) A45547219

Analyzing Economic Inequality in Hispanic Immigrant Population in the United States by Using Micro/Macro-Level Lenses

According to the 2012 American Community Survey (ACS), the U.S. immigrant population stood at approximately 40.8 million, or 13 percent of the total U.S. population of 313.9 million (Nwosu, C., Batalova, J., & Auclair, G., 2014). Along with its large number, immigration has had a very significant impact on the U.S society, and especially it has increased the diversity of the United States in many ways. In particular, there are large differences in poverty rates across racial groups. In that regard, according to the 2010 Census Bureau Reports, in 2009, the poverty rate was 9.9% for Whites, 12.1% for Asians, 26.6% for Hispanics, and 27.4% for Blacks. This data illustrates that Hispanics and Blacks experience disproportionately high percentages of poverty in comparison to Whites and Asians counterparts.
This paper will be focused on Hispanic immigrant population since Hispanics are a rapidly growing group in the United States and more tend to be poor (Broussard & Alfred, 2009). In details, Hispanic population grew 43 percent between 2000 and 2010 (one in four Hispanics was poor in 2009), and it is projected to triple in size by 2050 (Nwosu, C., Batalova, J., & Auclair, G., 2014). Moreover, income inequality was higher among Hispanics than among whites (Nwosu, C., Batalova, J., & Auclair, G., 2014).

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