The Effect of Black Power on the Emergence of Yellow Power

1257 WordsApr 4, 20146 Pages
The Sixties In America (AMST 1200) Professor Osman November 18, 2013 The Effect of Black Power on the Emergence of Yellow Power African-Americans were not alone in the shift to “ethnic power.” Other minority groups also shifted from the fight for integration and began to adopt the rhetoric of ethnic power and pride in the late 1960’s. By the late 1960’s, a host of other groups began to adopt the rhetoric of “power”: Red Power, Grey Power, Pink Power, Brown Power, etc. What were the similarities and differences between the rhetoric of Chicano Power, Yellow Power and Black Power? The 1960s in America brought a host of movements that pushed for equality, power, and change. Each movement helped to shape and effect the other…show more content…
Although Asian Americans did not face as much racism as the African Americans in the late 1960s, they still felt that they needed to break out of the restraints placed on them by the white community, as the Black Power Movement pushed had for in the late 1960s. African Americans of the Black Power Movement felt that their lives were being determined and manipulated by the whites who had control over American society. In the first declaration of The Black Panther Platform, they explain, “We want freedom. We want power to determine the destiny of our Black Community. We believe that black people will not be free until we are able to determine our destiny.” (Bloom and Breines, 146). The members of this movement believed that whites always had power over them because African Americans were never allowed the opportunities to show their full potential without the interference of the white community. In an SNCC essay, entitled The Basis of Black Power, Stokely Carmichael proclaims that, “Negroes in this country have never been allowed to organize themselves because of white interference. As a result of this, the stereotype has been reinforced that blacks cannot organize themselves.” (Bloom and Breines, 120). The Black Power Movement believed that the only way to break free of these ties and these stereotypes was to isolate themselves from the whites, including the whites involved in
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