The Effects Of Soda On High School Vending Machines Carries With It Heavy Economic Interest

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You may be familiar with recent regulation, which was initiated for the 2014-15 school year, where the United States Department of Agriculture enforced regulatory guidelines on food items sold in schools across the nation. Although there was previously a nutritional requirement for food in school, as Marion Nestle, a Professor of Nutrition at New York University, points out in her very influential article of the time, “this requirement [did] not apply to foods sold outside of school cafeterias in snack bars, school stores, or vending machines" (Nestle 308). Many proponents of the recent regulation are astonished that such regulation was not in place from the beginning. Unfortunately, this action was influenced by an ever-rising concern for the obesity rate in the US population, and not a desire to proactively encourage a healthy lifestyle. The history of soda in high school vending machines carries with it heavy economic interest, a plethora of lobbying and some imperative details, which we may find useful in our consideration of diet soda. Coca-Cola and PepsiCo are the two major companies that compete in the soft drink arena. By the late 1990s these companies were already well established in high school vending machines, but the competitive market required quite a bit more action (Nestle 310). In fact the companies began to, as Nestle claims, “view school children as an attractive marketing opportunity, and use every possible means to promote their products to this young,

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