The Effects of a Business Continuity Plan on Information Systems

3846 Words Jul 12th, 2013 16 Pages
The Effects of a Business Continuity Plan on Information Systems

Ronald E. Stamm Jr.
ISYS 204
Professor Choi
October 6th, 2011
Abstract
Since the dawn of the new millennium, as more and more companies are becoming more technologically savvy, they have been coming to the realization that there is a need to protect that data somehow. These companies seek out IT professionals who help them create Business Continuity Plans. These Business Continuity Plans help companies better safeguard and effectively retain their essential data in the case of a catastrophic failure of their network infrastructure. In this essay, I will be discussing the different intricacies of a Business Continuity Plan and how to effectively build one to suit
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A third example is one of a company that had a good Business Continuity Plan in place – Google. They attempted an update to their mail servers, which they soon found had a glitch in it causing emails to not be delivered to some users (0.02%) between 6:00 PM PST on February 27, 2011 and 2:00 PM PST on February 28, 2011. The good news was that they did onsite tape backups which, “…are offline, [so] they’re protected from such software bugs.” (Treynor, 2011) In this case, email was never lost and Google was able to restore service fully within a couple of days. (Treynor) Google had a sound Business Continuity Plan in place and were able to get their systems back up in operational in very short order.

What is a disaster as it relates to Information Systems? G5 Networks, an Information Technology firm in Orange County, California, defines a disaster as being classified by two different categories, “Disasters can be classified in two broad categories. The first is natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes, tornadoes or earthquakes…. The second category is man made disasters. These include hazardous material spills, infrastructure failure, or bio-terrorism.”(“Disaster Recovery”, n.d.) These two different types of disasters require proper planning and successful implementation of tested practices to recover from a
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