The Era of Good Feeling Dbq

770 Words Jun 7th, 2012 4 Pages
The Era of Good Feeling “The Era of Good Feeling” was a time of increased nationalism and prosperity for the nation. This of course is not completely true, debates over many important issues created a crack in the outward appearance of harmony during President Monroe’s two terms. These issues include sectionalism, foreign policy of isolationism and the rights of states vs. the rights of the federal government. During Monroe’s two terms, sectionalism, an excessive regard for sectional or local interest, increased greatly. This increase in sectionalism is due to acts like the Tariff of 1816. A tell tale sign that the Tariff of 1816 was going to cause sectionalism was that in the U.S. House of Representatives, the …show more content…
Another issue that created a crack in the outward appearance of harmony during “The Era of Good Feeling” was President Monroe’s foreign policy of isolationism. In the Monroe doctrine, President Monroe states, “we should consider any attempt on their [European powers’] part to extent their system to any portion of the hemisphere as dangerous to our peace and safety”. This statement makes the United States seem like a protector of Latin nations. However, the United States was not looking to protect Latin nations from European powers; the United States was looking to protect itself from European acts of aggression. This misconstrued view that the United States was the protector of Latin nations helps people buy into the false belief that “The Era of Good Feeling” really was a time of harmony in the United States. Another issue that made a crack in the outward appearance of harmony during “The Era of Good Feeling” was the debate over the rights of states vs. the federal government. This issue comes up with the proposal of many internal improvement plans. Plans to build roads that were to be federally funded were vetoed by supporters of states’ rights because they believed this power was out of the scope of the federal government. The passing of internal improvement bills would’ve positively impact the U.S. but debates over state and national rights
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