The Ethical Dilemmas of Collecting Data and the Consequential Revision of Commodities, Culture and the Politics of Representations Definitions

1751 WordsFeb 2, 20187 Pages
In today’s society, there is a growing amount of people whose data is being collected through different mediums within their everyday lives. This information is also known as big data; great amounts of data collected through various forms into large data systems. Ed Dumbill (2012) claims the input data is collected through systems such as “chatter from social networks, web server logs, traffic flow sensors, satellite imagery, broadcast audio streams, banking transactions, MP3s of rock music, the content of web pages, scans of government documents, GPS trails, telemetry from automobiles, financial market data, the list goes on”. The data is then stored within large data systems that are both restricted and highly accessible to certain individuals and groups. Many companies, who have increasing accessibility to big data, have been using this information to understand the wants and needs of their target group for the sole purpose of monetary or political profit. Big data analytics can reveal insights hidden previously by data too costly to process, such as peer influence among customers, revealed by analyzing shoppers’ transactions, social and geographical data (SOURCE – online article ed dumbill). As a result, people’s information or data has become assets to companies, being regarded as property to be bought and sold to between companies. However, this has put forward the following primary ethical dilemmas surrounding human rights: the right to informed consent and the

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