The Exterior Of The Rosicrucian Museum

1330 Words Dec 5th, 2016 6 Pages
The exterior of the Rosicrucian Museum was beautiful — the front of the building’s pillars were so brightly colored and pristine that it really did mimic the exterior of some kind of small palace; the garden and walkway located to the side of the building was also amazing and dense with foliage. It even had a small fountain with lionheads decorating it. And even though the entirety of the building’s floorplan was surprisingly small, it managed to contain a lot of condensed information, particularly about ancient Egyptian funeraries. Reading through the abundance of the museum’s information, it is evident that the funerary practices of ancient Egypt were so wholly intricate and persistently interwoven with many other aspects of ancient Egyptian life that it is incredibly easy to see that the concepts of magic and spirituality were so strongly valued during this time.
The museum’s Set of Canopic Jars, which were cited to have been built during the New Kingdom out of calcite and pigment, are said to have been created solely to hold the internal organs of the deceased within them so that they would remain preserved for eternity. Quite honestly, these jars don’t look too different from modernized urns, though modernized urns certainly don’t keep hold over organs, and instead only contain ashes. Regardless of this, it’s easy to see where the inspiration for urns could have been pulled from, as both sets of funerary jars are spectacularly intricate and detailed and seem to be…
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