The External Environment and Its Effect on Strategic Marketing Planning: a Case Study for Mcdonald’s

8424 Words Jul 1st, 2013 34 Pages
J. International Business and Entrepreneurship Development, Vol. 3, Nos. 3/4, 2008 289
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The external environment and its effect on strategic marketing planning: a case study for McDonald’s Demetris Vrontis*
School of Business, University of Nicosia, 46 Makedonitissas Ave., P.O. Box 24005, 1700 Nicosia, Cyprus Fax: 00357 22 353 722 E-mail: vrontis.d@unic.ac.cy * Corresponding author

Pavlos Pavlou
Department of Management and MIS, School of Business, University of Nicosia, 46 Makedonitissas Ave., P.O. Box 24005, 1700 Nicosia, Cyprus Fax: 00357 22 353 722 E-mail: pavlou.p@unic.ac.cy
Abstract: This case study has been compiled
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Based on that, the company objectives, strategies and tactics are drawn, aiming for organisational success and profitability. Multinational companies should have in mind that effective marketing strategies could not be developed without firstly analysing the external and internal environment in which the company operates. The external environment for a company covers many aspects. It is suggested that the environment covers two main areas: the macro-environment the micro-environment. The macro-environment consists of forces such social, cultural, legal, economic, political and technological. Within this are included factors such as demographics, green issues and larger societal and environmental forces. The micro-environment includes other environmental constraints, such as the structure of the market, the suppliers, customers, trends of the market, the public and competition. Equally important is the internal environment incorporating the examination of the company’s marketing mix (product, price, place, promotion) and service mix (people, process management, physical evidence). An analysis of the internal environment also covers other factors such as sales, profitability, market share and customer loyalty. The internal audit examines the company’s own resources and supplies suggestions as to the company’s strengths and weaknesses. Internal considerations are mainly controllable by the company and, therefore, companies should mostly avoid any
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