The Fall Of The House Of Usher

1612 WordsOct 25, 20167 Pages
The second message of Poe 's "The Fall of the House of Usher" is that moral disintegration should necessarily lead to destruction as a sort of mundane punishment. Usher blames himself for burying his sister before death so he expects punishment. One conclusion to be drawn from the final scene is that Roderick dies of fear. Madeline appears in her coffin and rushes upon him and he falls to the floor a corpse. Symbolically Madeline is just a physical embodiment of Roderick’s fears and punishment. With Roderick 's death, the bloodline of the family falls and the house collapses all at the same time at the story’s conclusion. The house could be thought of as a third member of the Usher family: Roderick, Madeline, and the House. Hoeveler states that the house itself is like a self-created grave, wherein Roderick “ literally walls his abjected self/his ‘sister’ into.” (Hoeveler 394) Louise Kaplan sees that there is an ambiguous relationship between the destruction of the house of Usher and the moral order. It appears to her that there is an incestuous relationship between the twins and this means moral disintegration. So such destruction of the house and death of the twins can be "an attempt to preserve the moral order." (Kaplan 52) Poe makes death and decay frightening because he reveals them to be the hidden destiny of everyone and everything. And this leads to the third message that death is the truth we all fear. The general and only message transmitted in all of Poe 's

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