The Fantastic Four As A Family: The Strongest Bond Of All

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Annotated Bibliographies: Superheroes and Philosophy Chapters 10-19 Ryall, Chris, and Scott Tipton. "The Fantastic Four as a Family: The Strongest Bond of All." Morris, Tom, and Matt Morris. Superheroes and Philosophy. Chicago and La Salle: Open Court, 2005.118-29. Print. Chris Ryall and Scott Tipton discuss the importance family has on not only superheroes but also on the people of society. They show the importance of family through the representation of The Fantastic Four and their need for each other. Using Aristotle’s “three bases of friendship,” they further explain what makes The Fantastic Four family and how the family distinguishes from other super hero teams. To conclude, the authors reiterate the difference between a friend of utility and a friendship of virtue by clarifying that a “complete friendship” is made when both individuals love each other and seek only to benefit one another. Both authors illustrate well the concept that society is like a broken organism that relies on everyone as a collective to make it whole or one big family. Thau, Michael. “Comic-Book Wisdom.” Morris, Tom, and Matt Morris. Superheroes and Philosophy. Chicago and La Salle: Open Court, 2005. 130-43. Print. Michael Thau emphasizes the lack of wisdom in today’s pop culture by referring to wisdom…show more content…
With this being said, the author explans that changing one occurrence in history will not only change that specific segment of time on that persons timeline, but rather it will change all segments of time in every world. With all this in mind, Hanley concludes that, even though people’s properties are constantly changing in time, people are still able to persist as a larger whole. This essay would be useful in a research paper discussing time travel; however, it is merely opinion based and would not present a reliable argument to any

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