The Feasibility of Chili Leaves Extract as Anti-Dandruff

1569 Words Jun 2nd, 2013 7 Pages
The Feasibility of Chili Leaves Extract as Anti-dandruff

ABSTRACT:

During this time, many people says that beauty does not refer only to your looks but also with the hair. MOst common problem of every individual is how to make their respective hairs not only beautiful, shiny smooth but also dandruff-free. There are a lot of shampoo introduce to us that answers our problem but still we dont know whether they are effective or not. That's why the researcher conducted a study entitled " The Feasibility of Chili Leaves Extracts as Anti-dandruff. This study is significant in the sense that it can help those people who are suffering with dandruff.

Table of Contents:

CHAPTER I:
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .i
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(Note: Time and the amount of sap depends on the number of leaves.)
URL:

http://www.madulapascal07.blogspot.com/
CHAPTER II:
REVIEW AND RELATED LITERATURE
The chili pepper, or more simply just "chili", is the fruit of the plant Capsicum from the nightshade family, Solanaceae. The name, which is spelt differently in many regions (chili, chile or chilli), comes from Nahuatl via the Spanish word chile. These terms usually refer to the smaller, hotter types of capsicum; the mild larger types are called bell pepper (simply pepper in Britain and Ireland or capsicum in Australasia).
Chili peppers and their various cultivars originate in the Americas; they are now grown around the world because they are widely used as spices or vegetables in cuisine, and as medicine.
Chili peppers have been a part of the human diet in the Americas since about 7500 BC. There is archaeological evidence at sites located in southwestern Ecuador that chili peppers were domesticated more than 6000 years ago [1][2], and is one of the first cultivated crops in the Americas. Chili peppers are thought to have been domesticated at least five times by prehistoric peoples in different parts of South, Central and North America, from Peru in the south to Mexico in the north and parts of Colorado and New Mexico (Ancient Pueblo Peoples).
Christopher Columbus was one of the first Europeans to encounter them (in the Caribbean), and called them "peppers" because of their
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