The Feminist Movement : The First Great Provider For The Human Species

1392 Words6 Pages
The feminist movement has been influenced by many factors; but most importantly by innate dispositions, dealings, money, and the gender of both males and females. To understand how the movement evolved one might want to start at the blameless beginnings of earlier male and female relationships. As a suggestion, this quote surmises a past perspective: “Granted then, that the first great provider for the human species was God the Father, surely the second great provider for the human species was Mother, the gatherer, planter, and general factum. Boulding (1976), citing Lee and de Vores tells us that in hunting and gathering societies, males contributed about 1/5 of the food for clan members, and females the other 4/5” (# 1; Bernard).…show more content…
Purely, living on the fringes of society an unaware of its day to day expense; neither their own status and/or ways to improve. On the other hand, are their opposites; for instance, the wealthy and hardworking religious families; both of whom are in some way indebted to society. This last attitude brings this paper to its start with feminist spokeswoman Mary Wollstonecraft and her well-known book about equality in education. “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman” (1792), “was written by British feminist Mary Wollstonecraft and is one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy. In it, Wollstonecraft responds to those educational and political theorists of the 18th century who did not believe women should have an education. She argues that women ought to have an education commensurate with their position in society, claiming that women are essential to the nation because they educate its children and because they could be “companions” to their husbands, rather than mere wives. Instead of viewing women as ornaments to society or property to be traded in marriage, Wollstonecraft maintains that they are human beings deserving of the same fundamental rights as men”(# 2; genius). This philosophy was mostly resigned to the wealthy and (parochial) catholic educators who by 1870 had worked to make public education available to all children. In the period in-between another important awareness formulated “The Cult of
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