The First Of Disney Pixar 's Animated Films Without A Male Centered Cast Featuring A Spunky, Defiant, Essay

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BRAVE The first of Disney Pixar’s animated films without a male-centered cast featuring a spunky, defiant, and disheveled Scottish princess (figure 5), Merida, was Brave. Opening with the expected invocation, “Once Upon a Time,” Disney prepares the audience to expect the stereotypical gender patterns of the past to include a land far away and a beautiful princess (Preston 198). Immediately opening with what might appear to be an twist from Disney tale’s tradition, the audience discovers that Merida is an adolescent proclaiming with unwavering certainty, “The one thing we [all] search for is the right to change” (Brave). This statement in this stage of life indicates, perhaps, that one should not grow up as quickly as possible but rather one should desire to enjoy the adventures of discovering one’s individual path without mimicking the romantic desires of adults (Ebrahim 46). Following the traditional fairy tale format, Merida sees her archenemy in another woman, her beautiful, proper, royal mother. The antagonistic Queen instructs her daughter with language that employs a two-value system: “Princesses don’t snort like boys,” “Only men carry weapons,” and “The amount of food on your plate is like your brothers,” to which Merida responds in song, “I am alive when [doing these masculine things]” (Brave, Sunderland 87). The plot quick unfolds indicating that Merida, expected to follow tradition, is bound by duty to enter into a marriage with a man who has won her hand by a

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