The Forces of Evil in The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus, by Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare’s Macbeth

567 WordsFeb 24, 20182 Pages
Dr. Faustus in The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus, by Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare’s Macbeth have similar interactions with forces of evil. Both characters believe it is necessary to gain power by following the devil or witches. Macbeth follows the witches’ equivocal prophecy to have absolute control over Scotland. He gives up his place in heaven to be king on earth. After Macbeth’s murder of Duncan, Macbeth has entered into a Faustian Bargain which he will never be able to return from. The Macbeth’s witches and Faustus’s devil promise power. The witches promise Macbeth power over Scotland, while the Devil promises Faustus power of the mind. Macbeth considers how the witches promise a bright future for him, but they could also ruin him in the end. He debates whether he should listen to prophecy by waiting for time and fate, or committing murder to seize the crown. Macbeth contemplates that Duncan’s murder, “Could trammel up the consequences, and catch, with his surcease, success” (1.7.2-4). There is a chance Duncan’s assassination could happen without consequence. Macbeth decides in his soliloquy during Act I, to commit to Duncan’s murder. The dagger that he hallucinates before him is, “The bloody business which informs thus to mine eyes” (2.1.57-8). With guilt and fear he visualizes the dagger he will use to kill Duncan with. As Macbeth follows the funeral bell, “That summons thee to heaven, or to hell” (2.1.75-77), the clock strike
Open Document