The Ford Wyoming Drive Development

3787 WordsNov 18, 201416 Pages
A. Background Info and Context The Ford Wyoming Drive-In (Now known as the Ford Drive-In) is located at 10400 Ford Rd in Dearborn, Michigan with the cross streets at Ford Road and Wyoming. Interstate I-94 is just nearby. The city of Dearborn grew rapidly in the nineteenth century. The families of Dumais, Drouillard, and Cissne began the formulation of the city. The name of the city came from Lewis Cass, the governor of the Michigan Territory at the time. He named it from his friend Major General Henry Dearborn. In 1825 much construction took place in the city as The Detroit Arsenal moved out the city for safety concerns onto Chicago Rd which is now Michigan Avenue. The arsenal was used as a supply depot for the army. By 1893 Dearborn had…show more content…
In 1887, John Haggerty took over the family brickyard’s fifty five acre lot off of Ford Rd. John managed his company by implementing upgraded techniques for retrieving the clay such as steam shovels and the work accumulated an approximate one point five million bricks within the first year. The company continued to do very well with projects to Dearborn’s and Detroit’s development, however a snag occurred with the economy. The Great Depression took its toll on the brickyard silencing the industry for a while and developments stopped. The Haggerty bricks were able to find some work to be used with President Roosevelt’s New Deal projects, which survived the company until all the majority of the clay was dug out from the property. John Haggerty himself became Wayne County’s Road Commissioner and later president of Michigan State Fair Association. He became involved in politics as well and was a Michigan delegate to the Republican National Convention. From 1927 to 1929 John was appointed as the Republican Party treasurer and his final role in the poitical main stage was when we was the Michigan Secretary of State from 1927-1930. The brickyard the Haggerty family left behind after all the clay had been removed had become littered with rough terrain and remnants of large holes dug out throughout the property. With the difficult soil, not many developments could take place there. 2. Rickenbacker Airfield Brickyards were very harmful and damaging to their environment
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