The Forest, The Trees, And The One Thing By Allan G. Johnson

1613 WordsOct 1, 20147 Pages
Being a component of society is an unavoidable status that every person falls into. To escape it would be impossible as society itself is the interweaving lives, systems, beliefs and ideas that every individual contributes to and experiences. Without a contextual perspective, comprehending one’s place in society while in the chaos of personal and widespread clashes is challenging. Sociology and, thus, the sociological perspective allows people to understand the threads that connect them to someone else or to the institutes that surround them. When two or more people become involved in each other’s lives, a society is born. Love and hate, respect and disdain, honesty and deception––all of these emotional and interhuman elements blend to create said society. A sociologist is able to see through these components and break them down individually as well as find how they blend together. In his article “The Forest, the Trees, and the One Thing,” Allan G. Johnson says that he and other sociologists “wonder what life really is all about, what this stream of interconnected people’s lives consists of, what knits it all together and what tears it apart, and what…it’s got to do with me” (2008). Human sociology is greater than just individual-to-individual relationships; it is as vast as social movements and government takeovers and as intimate as an individual woman reading a popular book. The study of sociology gives a person the ability to perceive relationships and lives in ways
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