The Fugitive Slave Acts of 1793 and 1850: A Comparative Analysis

414 Words2 Pages
Compare and contrast the Fugitive Slave Acts of 1793 and 1850 Introduction The federal acts of 1793 and 1850 provided for the return between states of escaped black slaves. Alike laws existing in both North and South in colonial days applied also to white indentured servants and to Native American slaves. Many Northern states also passed personal-liberty laws that allowed fugitives a jury trial, and others passed laws forbidding state officials to help capture alleged fugitive slaves or to lodge them in state jails. As a concession to the South a second and more rigorous fugitive slave law was passed as part of the Compromise of 1850. Fugitive slave laws, in U.S. history, the federal acts of 1793 and 1850 provided for the return between states of escaped black slaves. Similar laws existing in both North and South in colonial days applied also to white indentured servants and to Native American slaves. As slavery was abolished in the Northern states, the 1793 law was loosely enforced, to the great irritation of the South, and as abolitionist sentiment developed, organized efforts to get around the law took form in the Underground Railroad. Many Northern states also passed personal-liberty laws that allowed fugitives a jury trial, and others passed laws forbidding state officials to help capture alleged fugitive slaves or to lodge them in state jails References: Basinger, Scott J. "Regulating Slavery: Deck-Stacking and Credible Commitment in the Fugitive Slave

    More about The Fugitive Slave Acts of 1793 and 1850: A Comparative Analysis

      Open Document