The Fundamental Characteristics Of A Theodicy, A Rational Explanation For Evil, And Morally Good

1440 Words Dec 3rd, 2015 6 Pages
Just as western religions accept that G-d exists, we know that evil and suffering exists. Western religions know G-d as omnipotent, omniscient, and morally good. With these three fundamental characteristics in mind, G-d would have the power to destroy evil, the knowledge to know what evil is, and the will and desire to destroy it. Thus, the western conception of an all-powerful, all-knowing, and all-good G-d gives rise to a new Problem of G-d. To answer this problem, many scholars have searched for a theodicy, a rational explanation for evil in the world. When analyzing Judaism, the necessity for theodicy is most prevalent, and possibly most difficult, when trying to come to terms with the Holocaust. Using Elie Wiesel as my starting point, I will address the three conclusions scholars have reached: theodicy is possible, there is a human inability to construct a convincing theodicy, and a completely rejection of any possibility for theodicy. After presenting these options, I will offer criticisms as well as explain my own rationale for supporting Wiesel’s claim that G-d deserves to be questioned because He bears responsibility for evil in the world. Elie Wiesel’s theodicy is one of protest. People who share this view stay fully faithful to G-d while questioning him as to why he allows such atrocities, such as the Holocaust, to occur. Wiesel recognizes that G-d bears responsibility for evil in the world and therefore does not believe in a faultless being. Wiesel is very open…

More about The Fundamental Characteristics Of A Theodicy, A Rational Explanation For Evil, And Morally Good

Open Document