The Game Of Chess Games

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Knight to C6, it is how I had started almost every game of chess I had ever played. As my lungs filled with the pungent smell of coffee beans, I released my hand from the small wooden piece, and the game had begun. Sometimes I won and sometimes I lost, but oddly enough, it was never really about who won. You can learn so much about yourself and about life through the game of chess. It is crazy how much knowledge you can pick up about someone just from watching them play one simple game. The game was why I started playing, but the people were why I continued. I was not really a competitive chess player, and neither was my opponent, Justin. We were part of an unofficial chess club that we called ‘The Rookies.’ The club started as one…show more content…
The pawn on the other hand is not given a lot of value, and is very disposable. The point is that regardless of their value, they go in the same box at the end of the game. I went on to explain, “The destination is the same for both, the only difference between the two is how the player uses them on the battlefield.” Justin flashed me an annoyed face because I had once again attempted to see something extremely profound out of something that was probably just ordinary. Reluctantly he played along and said something like, “If I was a pawn, I would not really care what goes on after the game, the only thing that matters is staying alive and being useful in the game.” I am obviously not a pawn, but something inside me inquires a similar question. If when one dies, they lose their wealth and power, would it not be in their best interest while they are alive to stay alive and be useful in the game? If this is true, why does the game matter if there is not a game player? Is there any disgrace in being a pawn anyway? Maybe I am just crazy and the whole thing has nothing to do with real life. I think, if it isn’t just a hoax, I would be fine with being a pawn. As long as I benefit “the game” and am useful to “the game player,” I would be fine with not being given the honor and wealth during my life. I, like a pawn, have found my value not in my abilities, but rather in my potential to change the game. As an ordinary educated high school student,
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