The Genocide Of World War II

1946 WordsMay 3, 20168 Pages
The Decision to Commit Genocide in World War II In January of 1942, Hitler and the Nazis instituted the “Final Solution,” which was an organized and meticulous plan to exterminate the Jews. This plan eventually led to the death of six million Jews and has become one of the most infamous crimes against humanity ever perpetrated. Since the time that the Final Solution has been carried out, historians have debated exactly when Adolph Hitler and the Nazis decided to commit genocide against the Jews. Some historians argue that Hitler had wanted to annihilate the Jews for decades and his plan finally could be implemented in 1942. However, other historians counter that he and the Nazis did not always plan to take such an extreme course of action, and instead tried other things before they settled on genocide, which was only seriously considered very close to the time that it took place. Evidence from the time, though, ultimately disproves the theory that the Nazis committed genocide as a last resort to solve their problems with Jews. Instead, after analyzing historical evidence, one comes to the conclusion that even though the Final Solution was only initiated in 1942, it had been conceived of and planned decades before. The Final Solution may have been the ultimate and most extreme action that the Nazis took against the Jews, but it was far from the first time that the Jews had been harassed in Nazi Germany. From the time that the Nazi Party took control of Germany in 1933
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