The Global Drinking Water Shortage Essay

3536 Words 15 Pages
The Global Drinking Water Shortage


Table of Contents 2
Introduction 3
Year 2000 Opinions 3
Global Warming Issues 5
Technical Advances 6
Academic and Research Interviews 7
Scenarios… 9
Best Case isn’t Utopia 9
The Probably Outcome 11
The Worst Case 12
Conclusions 13
References or Bibliography 14







Introduction

Seventy one percent of our planet is covered by water, so it would seem that we could never run out of drinking water. But of that seventy one percent, ninety seven percent is salt water – extremely expensive to convert into drinking water. The other three percent is fresh water, which is contained in: glaciers, polar caps, lakes, rivers, and ground water. Out of this three percent, only one percent is
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As population of this planet has grown, we have increasingly tapped deeper into our planets fresh water resources and are now finding less available when and where it is needed. Our available fresh water is static, there is essentially no more fresh water on the planet today than there was 2,000 years ago when the earth's human population was less than three percent its current size. The trend of population growth is quite obvious.

According to the U.S. Bureau of the Census, the population of the world in 1955 was 2.8 billion; in the year 2014, the world’s population increased to 7.207 billion. According to World Watch, the population is expected to reach 8.1 billion people by the year 2025. As population increases, so does demand for pure drinking water, but changes in social attitudes and behaviors could redirect our present course and possibly curb the global population growth.

Social and economic trends in population growth appear to be changing. Our past can provide substantial insight into our future. Family planning services have had great success and produced dramatic results in reducing global population, thus reducing fresh water consumption. According the John Bongaarts, population has been reduced by an estimated 400 million people through the use of family planning programs. In many parts of the world, water problems are today more manageable than they…