The Grapes Of Wrath

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“At the heart of every immigrant’s experience is a dream- a vision of hope that is embodied in his or her destination” (Gladstein, p. 685). In the novel, The Grapes of Wrath, it is portrayed that the migrant’s thoughts of an American Dream is/was a simple and straightforward notion: go west (California), get employment and become rich. Little did they that know that an ideal and perfect life was difficult to accomplish and it corrupted the minds of those pursuing it. The author, John Steinberg, placed a lot of emphasis on the unachievable nature of the American Dream regarding economic stability in the novel through the cross-country migration of the Joads, their continuous and unpredictable changes in employment and eventually, their failure to find the success they so desired in California (Aghosh, Allentown, PA).
The novel, The Grapes of Wrath, is an
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The Joads were going down "something of a tricky intense street a way of escape from misery to an uncertain Californian deliverance" (Spangler). It can be reasoned that "when the one and only option is putting the family on the road to a foreign place, problems arise" (Spangler) and the Joads faced many problems. Connie, among his relatives, chose to accept reality rather than to live in a fantasy – pursuing the American Dream. For instance, “Connie strikes out all alone… he then forsakes the Joads' adamant quest for ranch work for the open doors in the city" (Bloom, p. 18). Connie understood that pursuing the American Dream was an exercise in vainness and although he ran far from the matters of money related uncertainty by leaving his significant other and child, he was essentially doing what was reasonable and rather taken after a future that would best suit him. While the Joads were on an endless excursion in search of the American Dream, they didn't discover any jobs that suited their trust of a money related way of

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