The Great Compromise Occurred In The Summer Of 1787 And

1314 WordsFeb 14, 20176 Pages
The Great Compromise occurred in the summer of 1787 and solved the debate about representation for the states. The founding of the modern political system was the result of the Great Compromise. The Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plans differed in their approach to the representation of states, as will be seen later in the paper. The differences in the representative system divided the larger states from the smaller states. The argument was also fueled by the debates between Federalists and Anti-Federalists regarding the issue of representation along with many other ideas, principle, and policies. Therefore, the two different plans for representation had political interests behind each plan. The Virginia Plan was written by James Madison…show more content…
Patterson wanted to give power to the states and not to the representatives. However, the large states were opposed to this plan because it gave the smaller states the same power as the larger states. Therefore, this plan promoted a weaker Federal Government with most power given to the states. There are similarities and differences between the New Jersey Plan and the Virginia Plan. Both plans wanted separated legislative, judicial, and executive branches to help prevent corruption. However, the Virginia Plan wanted a bicameral legislature with the lower house having representatives apportioned by population or based on the amount of contributions a state made to the government; the upper house would have representatives appointed by the state legislatures. Whereas, the New Jersey Plan wanted a single legislative branch with an equal number of representatives per state. The Virginia Plan was supported by the larger states because they would have more representation. Federalists also supported the plan because they wanted a strong Federal Government that had authority so that the states would not repeat the mistakes they made in the Articles of Confederation. The smaller states were afraid of the Virginia Plan because they were concerned that the majority would tyrannize the minority of the country. A strong Federal Government, as proposed by federalists and the Virginia Plan, was threating to
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