The Great Compromiser: Henry Clay and His Views on Foreign Policy

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The Great Compromiser: Henry Clay and His Views on Foreign Policy Henry Clay served as both Senator and Representative from Kentucky. He was elected to the Senate a total of four times, and to the House a total of three. He served as Speaker of the House on three separate occasions, and was the Secretary of State under President John Quincy Adams, between the years 1825 and 1829. Most of Clay's political career was with the Democratic Republican Party, and he ran for president in the election of 1824 as a Democratic Republican against John Quincy Adams. Clay ran for President two other times, as a National Republican Party candidate in 1832, and as a Whig Party candidate in 1844. Clay's legacy in American politics is highly controversial, due to his support for the Missouri Compromise and the Compromise of 1850. Clay was also a slave owner. Clay's appointment to the office of Secretary of State was in itself a controversial matter. That election cycle, Clay ran against John Quincy Adams. The election ended in a tie between Adams and Andrew Jackson, and it was up to Congress to cast the final vote. Although he had promised support for Jackson initially, Clay threw his support instead for Adams in order to forge new political ties and enhance expediency for his domestic policies. Doing so also secured Clay the position of Secretary of State, which is why his appointment by Adams was then called the "corrupt bargain." As Senator, Congressman, and Secretary of State, Clay

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