The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald

1155 Words Apr 27th, 2016 5 Pages
The Great Gatsby The Jazz Age was an era where everything and anything seemed possible. It started with the beginning of a new age with America coming out of World War I as the most powerful nation in the world (Novel reflections on, 2007). As a result, the nation soon faced a culture-shock of material prosperity during the 1920’s. Also known as the “roaring twenties”, it was a time where life consisted of prodigality and extravagant parties. Writing based on his personal experiences, author F. Scott Fitzgerald, distinctly conveys through The Great Gatsby the change within America’s society, class differences, and the effect of an absence of religion through the corruption of the “American Dream” during the Jazz Age. An ocean of immigrants arrived in America to start a new life searching for any available jobs during the seventeenth century. They brought upon a new belief of self-innovation through their hard work and a dedication called the “American Dream.” This dream represented the idea that a person wanting to become successful would put in hard work striving for advancement and that this potential advantage actually exists. F. Scott Fitzgerald helped seek the undergoing routines among the elite during the Jazz age. It was primarily through the narrator, Nick Carraway, that the author presents the illusion and aura of a man named Jay Gatsby. Jay Gatsby is an example of the corruption of the American Dream during the 1920’s. Gatsby, the main character within the novel,…
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