The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald

1839 WordsJun 23, 20158 Pages
Greatness is defined as “wonderful; first-rate; very good; being such in an extreme or notable degree; remarkable; exceptionally outstanding; important; highly significant or consequential” (dictionary.com). So, using that criteria as judgment, is Gatsby actually great? Historical figures that are considered “great” add perspective to the controversy of that question, making a model or guidelines for someone to be thought of as “great”. Jay Gatsby shares the title “great”, as these leaders do, yet may not fit the mold. Why? That is a sticky subject. Formerly known as James Gatz, Gatsby is “great” in that he pursues a dream until his death, something many people can’t do; however his “greatness” truly lies in the fact that he is defeated by his desire for a girl that did not belong to him anymore. He chases a dream that isn’t in reaching distance. This great failure is Gatsby’s legacy that makes him The Great Gatsby, but what makes Gatsby, or any man for that matter, “great”? Alexander The Great, 356 – 323 B.C., is the Macedonian king that forever lives as a hero. Parented by King Philip II and Queen Olympia, Alex led an army at the young age of 18 and conquered the entire region from the Mediterranean to India, leaving him to be one of the greatest military leaders the world has known. Strategy, generations of passed down wisdom, and even Aristotle’s mentoring all added up to make him extremely smart and unpredictable. Such a remarkable title for a young man, many say. The
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