The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald

1595 Words Apr 9th, 2015 7 Pages
The 1920s was a time of partying, and many social occasions. During these parties, how one behaves or acts around others, strangers or friends, can reveal intimate values of their character. Typically, social stresses can reveal similar behavioral patterns among whole groups of people as well. Fitzgerald uses social occasions to divulge the nature of different parties in The Great Gatsby, revealing values and mindsets of the different characters and social classes that shape the plot and outcome of the novel. The first social gathering of the novel displays the haughtiness and self-confidence of the old money class, as their small, civilized gathering shows the comfort they have in their wealth and prestige. The Buchanans have no need to throw extravagant balls, but rather remain firmly grounded in their wealth as described upon their introduction: “A breeze blew through the room, blew curtains in at one end and out the other like pale flags […]. The only completely stationary object in the room was an enormous couch on which two young women were buoyed up as though upon an anchored balloon” (8). The howling wind, representative of all the turmoil that will happen, cannot usurp the two women from their comfortable couch. Daisy and Jordan are securely tethered, not only to the couch, but also to their old money, which can save them from any level of turmoil. Tom Buchanan, Daisy’s husband, goes even further, slamming the window shut and ending the turmoil with a loud…
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