The Guggenheim Museum

2044 Words Jan 22nd, 2008 9 Pages
The Guggenheim Museum & its Giorgio Armani Exhibition In November of 1999, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York announced that it would devote an exhibition to honor the works of the celebrated Italian designer Giorgio Armani. However, during the announcement of the exhibition, the museum did not mention that it was simultaneously entering into a three-year agreement in which Armani pledged a donation of $15 million to Guggenheim. When The New York Times unveiled Armani's gift, the museum strongly denied any connection between the exhibition and the gift, stating that the exhibition was sponsored not by Armani but by In Style, a fashion magazine in which Armani advertises. The relationship between art and money is a debated …show more content…
Corporate members come from numerous sectors, from retail to educational to financial services (see Exhibit 2 for a list of corporate members for the Guggenheim Museum). This diversity in corporate sponsorship helps promote the diversity in audience that the Guggenheim Foundation is looking to attract by reaching out to people working in different sectors and in various locations around the world. To determine whether the Armani exhibition is considered a sell-out, the relationship between the objectives of the Armani exhibition and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation's mission statement plays a central role. Since the mission statement allows for interpretation of what is considered art in the modern and contemporary periods, the Armani exhibition does fit into this mission. Additionally, since the Foundation strives to put on "exceptional exhibitions" for an "increasingly diverse international audience," the Armani exhibition fulfills this part of the mission because it attracted a high level of attention—from celebrities to experts in the fashion industry to businesspeople—who came from different parts of the world to see the famous works of Armani. Thus, this exhibition does appear to fulfill the mission of the Foundation. However, it is important to note that while at face value the Armani exhibition seems to fulfill the mission of the Foundation, the actual Armani exhibition itself tells a different story. The Armani exhibition was meant to be a
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