The Harlem Renaissance Poets Essay

1317 Words Feb 5th, 2013 6 Pages
Assignment 2: Project Paper: Harlem Renaissance Poets
Karron Scott
Prof. Josiah Harry
HUM 112: World Cultures II
11/27/2012

The Harlem Renaissance was a wonderful allotment of advancement for the black poets and writers of the 1920s and early ‘30s. I see the Harlem Renaissance as a time where people gather together and express their work throughout the world for everyone to see the brilliance and talent the black descendants harness.
The two authors I picked were W.E.B Du Bois and Langston Hughes. The reason why I picked these two is because of the dedicated work they have flourished during the Harlem Renaissance. W.E.B Du Bois was one of the most famous black political leaders during that time. Du Bois had a lot of talent to bring
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One poem I chose from Langston Hughes that grabbed my immediate attention is his poem “The Weary Blues”. This poem written by Hughes is very powerful to me and expresses a deep message within for all Americans during that time; double-consciousness is notable all throughout the entire poem. Langston Hughes, who was one of the main focal points of figures of the Harlem Renaissance, tries to remain conscientious to his African-American roots in his foundation. His poem “The Weary Blues” is the perfect example of double-consciousness. The author of the article places an immersed question: Was Langston Hughes able to overcome the “double-consciousness” and take the pot luck with African origins and roots, or did he also not know how to manage to escape from the assimilation in the melting-pot of the American culture? Reading the poem from him, he actually provides the answer, which he states that the poet succeeds in promoting the “folk” (Black) tradition, having to compromise with the compulsory framing into American (White) reality of the form and the content of the subject.
The idiopathic themes expressed in both, Langston Hughes and W.E.B Du Bois during their time period were expounded in great detail. One line from W.E.B Du Bois poem “The Song of the Smoke” said “For blackness was ancient ere whiteness began”, this shows the